Telerehabilitation Store and Forward Applications: A Review of Applications and Privacy Considerations in Physical and Occupational Therapy Practice

Christopher Peterson, Valerie Watzlaf

Abstract


An overview of store and forward applications commonly used in physical and occupational therapy practice is reviewed with respect to regulation, privacy, security, and clinical applications. A privacy and security checklist provides a clear reference of pertinent regulatory issues regarding these software applications. A case study format is used to highlight clinical applications of store and forward software features. Important considerations of successful implementation of store and forward applications are also identified and discussed.

References


Cohn, E.R., & Watzlaf, V. (2012). Telepractice and informed consent: Readability of VoIP privacy policies. Poster presentation at the national meeting of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, Atlanta, GA.

Charness, N., Boissy, P., Demiris, G., Krupinski, E. A., Lai, A. M., & Lopez, A. M. (2010). How human factors can influence the elderly in the use of telemedicine. Telemedicine Journal and e-Health, 16, 860–866. doi:10.1089/tmj.2010.9948

Ehrler, F., & Lovis, C. (2014). Supporting elderly homecare with smartwatches: Advantages and drawbacks. Studies in Health Technology and Informatics, 205, 667–671.

Rinehart-Thompson, L. (2013). Introduction to health information privacy and security. Chicago: AHIMA Press

Schumer, C.E. (2014, August 10).

Press release - Schumer reveals: Without their knowledge, FITBIT bracelets & smartphones apps are tracking user’s movements and health data that could be sold to third parties; calls for FTC to require mandatory “opt-out” opportunity before any personal data can be sold. Retrieved from http://www.schumer.senate.gov/newsroom/press-releases/schumer-reveals-without-their-knowledge-fitbit-bracelets-and-smartphone-apps-are-tracking-users-movements-and-health-data-that-could-be-sold-to-third-parties-calls-for-ftc-to-require-mandatory-opt-out-opportunity-before-any-personal-data-can-be-sold

Sunyaev A., Dehling, T., Taylor, P., & Mandl, K. (2014). Availability and quality of mobile health app privacy policies. Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1136/amiajnl-2013-002605.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [HHS]. (n.d.). Health information privacy: For covered entities and business associates. Retrieved from http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/coveredentities/

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [HHS]. (2006). Health information privacy: Frequently asked questions. Retrieved from http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/faq/business_associates/250.html

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [HHS]. (2007). 45 CFR 160.103. Retrieved from http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2007-title45-vol1/pdf/CFR-2007-title45-vol1-sec160-103.pdf

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2013). Health information privacy: Business associate contracts. Retrieved from http://www.hhs.gov/ocr/privacy/hipaa/understanding/coveredentities/contractprov.html

Walji, M. F., Kalenderian, E., Piotrowski, M., Tran, D., Kookal, K. K., Tokede, O., … Patel, V. L. (2014). Are three methods better than one? A comparative assessment of usability evaluation methods in an EHR. International Journal of Medical Informatics, 83, 361–367. doi:10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2014.01.010




DOI: https://doi.org/10.5195/ijt.2014.6161

  

Refbacks

  • There are currently no refbacks.




Copyright (c) 2015 Christopher Peterson, Valerie Watzlaf

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.