In-home Telerehabilitation for Proximal Humerus Fractures: A Pilot Study

Michel Tousignant, Anne-Marie Giguère, Marilène Morin, Julie Pelletier, Annie Sheehy, François Cabana

Abstract


The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of an in-home telerehabilitation program for proximal humerus fractures. Seventeen patients with proximal humerus fractures were recruited by an orthopedic specialist during emergency room visits. Telerehabilitation treatments were given at the patient's home over an 8-week period using a videoconferencing system. Pain (Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire [SF-MPQ]), disabilities including shoulder range of motion (flexion, extension, internal rotation, external rotation, abduction), and upper limb function (Disability of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire [DASH]) were measured in face-to-face evaluations before (T1) and immediately after (T2) the program. Participant satisfaction with the health care received was also evaluated at T2 with the Health care satisfaction questionnaire. All the clinical outcomes improved post-intervention (p < 0.05). Also, patient satisfaction was high (overall score of 82 ± 7%). Therefore, in-home teletreatment seems to be a promising way to dispense rehabilitation services for this population.




DOI: https://doi.org/10.5195/ijt.2014.6158

  

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Copyright (c) 2015 Michel Tousignant, Anne-Marie Giguère, Marilène Morin, Julie Pelletier, Annie Sheehy, François Cabana

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